In the Media

Meeting Resistance on Iraq

On-the-ground reporting with resistance fighters in Baghdad revealed a different narrative than the one portrayed by many in the mainstream news.

Read The Full Article:
http://www.nieman.harvard.edu/reportsitem.aspx?id=100048

Meeting Resistance on Anderson Cooper 360

Molly and Steven Connors interviewed by CNN's Anderson Cooper Meeting Resistance is now available on DVD at http://www.meetingresistance.com

Watch The Full Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0zBBMKK1b8

Op-Ed: Know Thine Enemy

In a video Op-Ed by documentary filmmakers Molly Bingham and Steve Connors, Iraqis explain the roots of the insurgency.

Watch The Full Video:
http://video.nytimes.com/video/2007/10/16/opinion/1194817115663/op-ed-know-thine-enemy.html

An Unseen Side of Iran

The commonly accepted Western narrative about Iran is that it is part of the "Axis of Evil," a society in which women are oppressed and the nation is bursting with extremist Muslims. This is, of course, an oversimplification that misrepresents reality. As journalists, we know the importance of adding flesh to these bare-boned narratives by asking questions, observing and then rebuilding the story with the complexity that any true narrative demands.

Read The Full Article:
http://www.nieman.harvard.edu/reportsitem.aspx?id=101158

Home from Iraq

Journalist urges Americans to search for truth, freedom

We spent 10 months in Iraq, working on a story, understanding who the people are who are fighting, why they fight, what their fundamental beliefs are, when they started, what kinds of backgrounds they come from, what education, jobs they have. Were they former military, are they Iraqi or foreign? Are they part of al-Qaida? What we came up with is a story in itself, and one that Vanity Fair ran in July 2004 with my text and pictures. [My colleague Steve Connors] shot a documentary film that is still waiting...

Read The Full Article:
http://www.commondreams.org/views05/0509-32.htm

Ordinary Warriors

Washington has dismissed the Iraqi resistance as extremists, Saddam loyalists, foreigners, and criminals. But Baghdad is full of ordinary men and women—teachers, shopkeepers, mothers—who are learning a clandestine new trade: armed insurgency. Getting to know a number of fighters, and discovering how organized they have become, the author finds this disparate army shares one belief: that expelling the U.S. is a battle they cannot refuse, or lose.

Read The Full Article:
http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2004/07/iraq200407 or
download the article. (PDF-ZIP 16MB)

Why Elections Won't Quell Iraq Resistance

THE COMPOSITION of the Iraqi resistance is not what the US administration has been calling it, and the more it is oversimplified the harder it is to explain its complexity.

I spent from August 2003 until June this year in Baghdad researching the resistance. That's obviously not a comprehensive study, but it does provide a more complete picture of the resistance than the administration's. My objective is not to romanticize the fighters or their fight, but merely to better understand what our realistic choices are in Iraq and the Middle East.

Read The Full Article:
http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2004/12/15/why_elections_wont_quell_iraq_resistance?pg=full

Dispatch: Eight Days in Abu Ghraib

I will not forget when I first returned to Baghdad, walking the length of the cool marble lobby to the elevators at the Palestine Hotel to go see Seamus Conlan on the 8th floor and getting in the elevator alone with a bell boy and his trolley. I had trepidation about entering the building in the first place. It gave me the creeps to return to the place from which I'd been taken on the early morning of March 25th. But I was back, and I was going to see Seamus. Times were different. The regime had fallen. My concerns that the boogey men who took me from my room that night were still loitering around in the shadows wasn't wrong, but it wasn't a reason not to return to work either.

Read The Full Article:
http://www.digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/dis_bingham.html